Home with the Lord

Home with the Lord

On July 31, 2016 Jamison, Kathryne, Ezra, Violet and Calvin were traveling to their final training session in Colorado, prior to their long-term deployment to be global partners with Christ Bible Institute in Nagoya, Japan. (See article in Omaha World Herald.)  On a long stretch of highway in Nebraska, while stopped in a construction zone, a semi truck rear-ended them at over 60 miles per hour.  The van Jamison’s family was in, as well as the truck, burst into flames and was slammed into several other vehicles.  The entire Pals family went into eternity together.

We deeply love them, and will sorely miss them. We weep and mourn and ache together. Pastor Jason Meyer writes, “Some look at death and see a tragedy—the tragic end of all their hopes and dreams. As Christians, we look death in the face and see ultimate victory, not tragedy, because Jesus defeated sin and death for all of his people. Facing death without Jesus is an eternal tragedy—weeping that never ends.

“And so, while we grieve, we rise up with resurrection faith as we embrace together our blessed hope that Jesus is the Resurrection and the Life. And so, we celebrate the fact that the Pals family is not dead, but more alive than ever because of the grace of God that is ours in Jesus Christ.”

The Jamison and Kathryne Pals Foundation has been established to spread the Gospel of Joy through Jesus Christ to Japan and beyond.  Donations may be sent to the Pals Foundation at 3570 Vicksburg Ln N, Ste 100, Plymouth, MN 55447.  palsfamilyfound.org.  

To view the memorial celebration of their lives at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, MN, click below.

To hear Dr. John Piper’s funeral prayer, visit:

http://www.desiringgod.org/interviews/john-piper-s-funeral-prayer-for-a-family-of-five

An update on our children

An update on our children

We’ve spent the last couple posts sharing about our burden and vision for ministry in Japan.  Going forward, we plan to focus primarily (though not exclusively) on what’s happening in our family, starting with an update on our children.

Calvin.  Our little guy is quickly becoming not little–he’s already well over 14 pounds.  He loves to eat, smile and baby talk.  He’s probably our toughest baby yet, having survived the loving onslaught of his older brother and sister for over two months now.

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“I’ll go; send me.”
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A boy and his Momma…yet sinners.

Violet.  Her middle name is Joy, and that is fitting.  She is a happy soon-to-be two year old who loves babies and always wants to “go to Caribou (Coffee) tomorrow.”  She can normally be found talking on your cell phone with her Grandpa and Grandma or putting your chapstick on her babies.

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Violet went on a rare date with Momma to a beautiful garden by the lake.
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A near-perfect glimpse into Violet’s personality.
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Two of Violet’s favorite babies.

Ezra.  When Ezra grows up, he still wants to be a worker guy, and we think he will be a good one.  He has greatly enjoyed living in the Land of 10,000 Cousins (Papa and Nana’s house), where legos abound and naps are few.  He is learning to swim and can hold his breath underwater for 14 seconds.  Ezra understands well that we’re moving to Japan soon, though he wants to know if it’s a short or long drive from Grandpa and Grandma’s house.

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Fun at the beach.
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Ezra meeting a cow for the first time.  The cow was afraid.
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Ezra brings every night to a close with 1) family worship, 2) reading two books while eating apple slices and 3) story/snuggle time.
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When the front yard turned into a puddle, Ezra knew what to do.  Violet learned quickly from her big brother.
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When streams of water flow from your boots…

Unreached and how we reach them

Unreached and how we reach them

In our last post, we shared why we feel burdened for unreached people groups.  More specifically, we feel a burden for Japan, the largest unreached nation in the world.  People are surprised to hear of the gospel needs in Japan.  In some circles, the work of missions has become synonymous with humanitarian work.  The popular picture of a missionary is someone who runs an orphanage, does community health, digs wells or comes into a country after a disaster strikes.  Japan is a well developed country, so why would they need missionaries?  That question is why we wrote our last post, and why we’ll continue writing this one.

We are not against humanitarian work.  I (Jamison) am of the belief that–in a shrinking world–wisely and generously caring for the global poor is one way to fulfill the command to “love your neighbor as yourself.”  I simply want to point out that many of the good humanitarian activities that Christian missionaries take part in are not the distinguishing activities of Christian missions.  Non-Christians can do them and are doing them just as well, in some cases better.

The thing that makes Christian missions unique is Jesus Christ.  The work of Christian missions is making him known in places and among people where he is not yet known; worshipped where he isn’t yet worshipped; obeyed where he isn’t yet obeyed; loved where he isn’t yet loved.  In other words, missions is the work of “mak[ing] disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.  And, behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

This is nothing new.  The people of God have affirmed it since the Great Commission was issued some 2,000 years ago.  But, from time to time, history shows that we’re prone to forget, to lose sight of the work Jesus Christ has left to his people until the end of the age.

Let me be clear–we are not writing to lament the current state of missions.  We have total confidence in God that he will accomplish his work in this world, among all the peoples of the earth, as I recently shared in a sermon. We have a secure promise that the Lord himself will gather worshippers from every tribe and tongue and people and nation.  He will build his Church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.  The Lord has burdened himself with the work of rescuing sinners from the far corners of the earth.  He will do it; he is doing it even now.

God himself is the One who reaches the unreached, making the logic of passages like Romans 10:13-15a striking, “‘For everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.’ How then will they call on him in whom they have not believed?  And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard?  And how are they to hear without someone preaching?  And how are they to preach unless they are sent?”

In his wisdom, the Lord has chosen to carry out the work of reaching the unreached and discipling the nations, through those who go to preach and those who send them to do so.  The logic is inescapable.  The Lord has commissioned the work, promised to complete the work himself and then said he will do it as the gospel is proclaimed from by weak and frail people like us, who are sent by people like you.  That is how God has said he will reach the unreached.

He has also said much more.  To quote from PT O’Brien’s Gospel and Mission in the Writings of Paul, “Proclaiming the gospel meant…not simply an initial preaching or with it the reaping of converts; it also included a whole range of nurturing and strengthening activities, which led to the firm establishment of congregations” (pg. 43).  The activities of distinctly Christian missions are aimed toward the establishment of local congregations, not simply making converts.  Coming to Christ means being incorporated into his Body and its local expressions.

To go back to what we’ve already asserted, the thing that makes Christian missions unique is Jesus Christ.  And, Jesus Christ manifests himself to the world through his people.  Therefore, we aim to reach the unreached by establishing local, visible expressions of Jesus Christ.

In this age, the Church is imperfect, to say the least.  We are not blind to her shortcomings.  Yet, we dare not downplay her beauty either.  The Church is, after all, the Bride of Christ.  Wisdom would tell us to think twice before insulting a man’s wife.  The Lord did not consider himself above dying for the Church; he does not now count himself above dwelling in her midst and working through her.  If you care about people knowing and experiencing Jesus Christ, you should care about the work of establishing churches among the nations.

And, if you care about the poor, needy and destitute of the world, you should care about church planting.  Where else can people go to find Jesus Christ–the one who is full of mercy, who healed the sick, cleansed lepers, gave sight to the blind, drove out demons and defeated death?  No one loves the poor like Jesus loves the poor; no one has the power to help them like Jesus does.  He is the One both the rich and poor alike need more than anything else.  And, Jesus Christ has chosen to dwell in the midst of his people in a unique way and to carry on his work for this world through them.  Church planting, then, is a work of compassion–the ultimate humanitarian work–through which people come to be loved and cared for by their Savior.

We desire to see the country of Japan filled with healthy, outward-facing, Christ-exalting churches–manifestations of Jesus Christ, where the millions of Japanese people with depression can take refuge; where the one million young men who have locked themselves in their rooms can find freedom from shame; where the 30,000 who would commit suicide every year can instead find hope.

If you have the same desires, you can learn more about the ministries we will be supporting at Christ Bible Institute here.  And, you can learn more about partnering with us in the work here.

Unreached and why we care

Unreached and why we care

When people are really passionate about something, they don’t generally keep it to themselves.  Sports fans wear jerseys.  People put bumper stickers on their cars.  Others bring up politics wherever they go–birthday parties, weddings, funerals, etc.  Social media exists, and the masses use it.  Clearly, human beings are wired to express our love for the things we love.  Some more so than others.  As C.S. Lewis pointed out, our praise completes our joy–we haven’t fully enjoyed something until we’ve told others about it and have invited them into it.  There are exceptions, of course, but the majority of the time we want others to care about the things we care about.  And, though we’re reluctant to admit it, we’re saddened (or outraged) when they don’t.

How much more is this true when the thing we care about is not only a passing interest, but an essential reality to our very existence–something that if it were taken away from us, we would cease to be who we truly are.  So it is with Christians and Jesus Christ.  We exist “in Christ.”  If you were to somehow remove him, all that we are would go with him.  He is our Life.  Apart from him we can do nothing, and we are nothing.  When a person comes to know Jesus Christ in all of his beauty, love, compassion, wisdom, power and glory, it should come as no surprise that he or she would desire others to know him and to be burdened when others don’t.  We want others to have Life in Christ, forever.

An illustration.  This is an old, sad and true story from my previous work.

There were two children living in a secluded village in Sub-Saharan Africa, a boy who was about five years old and a girl who was two years old, if I’m remembering correctly.  Like many children in their area, they did not know their father and depended solely upon their mother, who was sick with HIV/AIDS.  When she died, they were left without anyone to care for them.  The five year old boy, now the caretaker, led his sister from house to house, looking for food.  After several weeks, the children–who were already malnourished while their mother was alive–looked as though they wouldn’t live much longer.  A woman from the village told them that they needed to go to an orphanage in a nearby town–it would be the only place where they could find food.

The pastor who ran the orphanage already had too many children to house and feed.  So, when the two newly orphaned children arrived, he regrettably turned them away.  An older orphan saw the little boy and girl turning back and begged the pastor to let him share his own food.  The boy set out to find them, but they were already gone.  The pastor, feeling guilty for having turned them away, went out to search.  He, too, was unsuccessful and for several days was weighed down by grief.  Two weeks later, he saw something lying in a ditch.  He bent down, picked up a lifeless body and saw the face of the two year old girl he had turned away.  She tragically, but not surprisingly, starved to death.  The pastor never found her older brother.

Now, I like to think every single one of us, if given the opportunity, would do whatever we could to give those two kids food.  The thought that there are children in the world who are starving to death is emotionally unbearable for anyone who is willing to actually consider it.  But, it is a reality.  On average, somewhere between 6,000 and 7,000 children under the age of five die every day from hunger-related causes.

Though most people do not have the same emotional response, it is equally true and eternally more tragic that there are–according to conservative estimates–two billion people who will never have the opportunity to hear about Jesus Christ.  Jesus said, “I am the Bread of Life, whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst” (John 6:35).  The context of John 6 makes it clear–Jesus does for the human soul what food does for the human body.  As surely as food is needed for life, so Jesus is needed for eternal life.  People will eat and eat and eventually die.  But, if people eat the Bread of Life, they will live forever.  It is good to share food with the hungry; how much greater is it to share Jesus Christ.

The above story about the two children in Africa is an illustration of a spiritual reality for over two billion people in the world today.  They could go door-to-door looking for Bread that gives life and is Life, and they will not find it.  They will starve, unless someone goes to offer them Food.  We have the opportunity to do just that.  We have what they need, whether they know they need him or not.  His name is Jesus Christ.  We love him.  He is everything to us.  It is only natural that we want others to forever share in everything that we have in him.  That’s why we care deeply about unreached people groups, and that’s why we will, Lord willing, go.

Click Here to learn more about how you could help send us.  And, Click Here to read more about our burden for the unreached in Japan.

 

Calvin’s Early Days

Calvin’s Early Days

On May 21st, Calvin Boaz Pals came forth into the world.  He bears the name of a Reformer (John Calvin) and a Kinsman Redeemer (Boaz, from the book of Ruth).  We thank God for this little boy and the early days we’ve had with him!  May the Lord give many more days, and may they be joyful in Christ, fruitful for His Kingdom and eternal in duration.

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With a birth weight of 9 lbs, 8 oz, Calvin has no lack of chubby wrinkles, to the joy of his father.

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His biceps are a distinguishing feature.
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Ezra meeting Calvin for the first time.
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The first of many snuggles.
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A new part of our morning routine.
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“I wish he would wake up.”
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In honor of Calvin’s birth, I’ve picked up reading The Institutes of the Christian Religion again.  Here is the boy’s introduction to his name’s sake.
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Please pray with us for Calvin!

Father in Heaven,

You are our Maker and Sustainer.  There is none like you, no one who can do the works that you do.  We are in awe of how you create and sustain every life, from the tiniest embryo to the mightiest man.  There is no one who can draw breath without your willful action, no one who can keep his own heart beating, unless you do it for him.  So, it is fitting that we entrust Calvin to you.  It is our joy to do so, because we know you!  You are a God who is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.  You will not deal wrongly with our boy.

Work within Calvin that which is pleasing in your sight.  May he grow strong in body and mind, only to be exceeded by the strength of his heart–You, Lord–be the strength of his heart and his portion forever!  As he increases in years, may he increase in meekness and experience the fullness of its blessedness in Christ.  As he tastes the sweet joys of life in this world, may he see them as gifts from your hand and receive them with humility.  When he drinks of the bitter cup of pain that all must taste, may he learn to quickly cry to you for help and seek to right any wrongs.

May he be a man who knows well his own sin but does not despair, because he has a great Savior.  O Lord, may the name of your Son, Jesus Christ, be sweet to our boy from a young age.  May he find redemption  in Jesus’ passion, forgiveness in His cross, purification in His blood, newness of life in His resurrection, a rich inheritance in His Kingdom, fellowship in His Body, security in the sealing of His Spirit and great hope in the promise of eternal life.  May he draw a fully supply from the treasure of blessings that are found in Jesus Christ, always.  Do this and more for our son, that the glory of your Son might shine brightly through him in Japan.

We ask this with great confidence in Jesus’ name, Amen.

We are still in need of financial and prayer partners.  If you are interested in partnering with us and helping send Calvin to Japan, please visit the Partner with Us page to read an update on our current needs.

 

 

Connor and Preston’s Treat Stand

Connor and Preston’s Treat Stand

“I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, always in every prayer of mine for you all making my prayer with joy, because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now.” -Philippians 1:3-5.

We’re in a season of what most people call “support raising.”  We prefer to call it “partner development,” because it more accurately captures the reality that our ministry in Japan requires the participation of friends and family around the world.  You are our partners in the Gospel.  When you give, pray and support in practical ways, you’re entering into the work of proclaiming the good news of Jesus Christ in Japan.  Our role in the work is going; your role in the same work is sending.  For this reason, we–like the Apostle Paul–thank God for you, every time we remember you in prayer.

We were recently blessed by the creative sending efforts of two of our nephews, Connor and Preston.  On Saturday, they put together an excellent treat stand, donating 50% of their revenue to the work in Japan.  After taking a two-dollar order, Preston said, “One dollar for me; one dollar for Jamison and Kathryne.”  Praise God–that’s a beautiful picture of what many of you are doing for us…and for the joy of the Japanese people in Jesus Christ.

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Saturday morning was cold, so Connor and Preston served coffee and hot chocolate.
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We’re grateful for the support and for spreading the word to neighbors.

 

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A good spread and art-work.
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The salesman.
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Great customer service.
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The treat stand was a creative way to meet and serve neighbors, while also being a part of the work we’ll be doing in Japan.  

Thank you, Connor and Preston (and parents + Gavin).  And, thank you to everyone else who is partnering with us.  We know that you’re also working diligently and creatively to help send us to Japan, and we pray that “God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus.”-Philippians 4:19.

Please click here if you are interested in joining with us in ministry.

Living in Transition

Living in Transition

Last week, we said “good-bye” to the house we’ve lived in for the past four years.  It’s a small, perfectly rectangular duplex that has always reminded me of a specific vehicle from Star Wars.  The first floor that we called “home” was much less than the advertised 900 square feet and was originally designed to house a printing press about 100 years ago.  The windows were so old that you couldn’t open them without showering yourself in paint chips, and it cost hundreds of dollars to keep the place from becoming unbearably cold in the winter.  The floors often squeaked loud enough to wake sleeping babies.  There was no bathtub, but there were lots of ladybugs.  The garage door could only be lifted by someone capable of squatting and pressing a couple hundred pounds, but the garage was too small to fit anything larger than a bicycle anyways, so it didn’t really matter.

But, it was our home, and, somehow, we will really miss this place.  It is, after all, the place where we brought home both of our children–the only earthly home they’ve ever known.  We will miss being three blocks from the Mississippi River and all of its trails.  We will miss mowing Mr. and Mrs. Johnson’s lawn in the summer and shoveling their sidewalks in the winter.  We will miss playing in the sandbox and sink-hole with our neighbors.  Mostly, we will miss our neighbors.

We’ve come to learn that the life that we’ve chosen to live is one of constant transition.  As soon as you settle in one place and begin to associate it with “home,” you uproot and move onto the next place.  While this comes with obvious challenges (Violet cried and clung to the couch when we gave it to Uncle Chris, “My couch, Daddy!”), it also comes with a clear, sweet reminder.  It’s an object lesson to us and our children that this world is not our home.  You can and, to some extent, must settle in certain places for certain seasons, but we will not permanently settle in until Jesus Christ comes back.

Here is what Jesus says in John 14:1-3, “Let not your hearts be troubled.  Believe in God; believe also in me.  In my Father’s house are many rooms.  If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you?  And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also.”

Our hearts are not troubled, because our Father has a house with room for us.  Jesus Christ is there now, preparing a place.  He is coming again.  When he does, he will take us with him, to be with him forever.  Then, we will put our roots down deeply and not take them up again. This is a home we can starting sinking our roots into now–we have a home that comes with us wherever we go, and we never have to leave.  His name is Jesus Christ.

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Our house for the past four years.
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Good-bye, furniture!
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Eating without a kitchen table.
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Napping without our couch.

We had lots of help with the move.  Thank you to all those who pitched in–Grandma, Grandpa, Nana, Ben, Malia, Joel, Lev, Lizzie, Moriah, Trevor, Scott, Brad, Eliot, the Foursome Fine Men’s Apparel truck.

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Lots of friends helped us load the truck.
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They worked quickly and joyfully.
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We fit pretty much everything we own into the truck from Papa’s store.  
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Our next transition–becoming a family of five.

Thank you for reading.  You can partner with us in ministry and help send us to Japan by Clicking Here.